The Future of California Elections (FoCE) is a collaboration between election officials, civil rights organizations and election reform advocates to examine and address the unique challenges facing the State of California’s election system.

About Us

About Future of California Elections

Future of California Elections (FoCE) is a nonprofit, nonpartisan network of election stakeholders that includes election officials, reform advocates, and civil rights and civic engagement groups from across the state. The FoCE mission is to modernize elections and expand participation which we accomplish by developing shared strategies for impact in the field of elections administration. FoCE staff convenes election stakeholders to ensure our election system serves all of California’s diverse electorate, including underrepresented voters, voters with disabilities and limited-English proficient voters.

To learn more about FoCE’s impact and current priorities, visit http://futureofcaelections.org/priorities-accomplishments/.

To see FoCE’s current members, visit http://futureofcaelections.org/members/.

Future of California Elections (FoCE) was formed in late 2011 and established in 2013 as a project of Community Partners, a 501(c)3, to support the work of the members in modernizing elections and expanding participation in California.

About Elections in California

California has been a national leader in regard to elections, including improving the transparency and auditability of elections and providing sample ballots to all voters. However, the state has far to go.

California ranks near the bottom nationwide in the percentage of eligible citizens actually registered to vote. There are millions of Californians who are eligible to vote but are not registered and the disparities are greatest among youth and communities of color. California is also home to more limited-English proficient and immigrant voters than any other state in the nation. In the last midterm general election, in 2014, just 18 percent of eligible Asian Americans and 17 percent of eligible Latinos in California turned out to vote, compared to 40 percent of eligible non-Asian Americans and Latinos.

California is the most diverse state in the nation. This creates opportunities to craft an election administration system that can meet voters where they are and develop best practices for serving all voters including underrepresented voters, voters with disabilities and limited-English proficient voters.